Stetson Law and Rhetoric Colloquium 2013

This past week, I was lucky enough to participate in the Law and Rhetoric Colloquium at Stetson University College of Law, put together by the inimitable Professor Kirsten K. Davis. Below is the announcement of the Colloquium, which includes a picture of the...

On Page Limits and Concision

At the beginning of every school year, my legal writing students face a double, daunting challenge: to learn to write about a topic they are unfamiliar with (the law) in a dialect that they are unfamiliar with (legal discourse). They go bananas when I tell them they...

Terrible Lawyer Email Signatures

Lawyers sometimes allow legalese to infect their writing—even their email signatures. Setting aside the implications* of this sort of email signature, I wanted to make a suggestion to all lawyers out there: please remove the obfuscating legalese from your “do...

Sunlight and Law School

As surprising as it is, the class action law suit against New York Law School seems to fit right in with the recent trend of criticizing law schools for misrepresenting (1) scholarships, (2) grads’ employment rates, (3) average grads’ salaries, and (4) any...

Marbury v. Madison Wordle

I couldn’t resist: Unfortunately, the Marbury v. Madison word cloud wasn’t nearly as fun as the Clinton speech in my last post. “Commission,” right in the middle, is kind of a bummer for such a transformative case. Yes, the case is about a...

Word Clouds as Discourse Analysis Tool

I just discovered Wordle, a free word-cloud generator. You paste any text you want into a box and the web site’s software generates a word-cloud. For those of you unfamiliar with word-clouds, Wikipedia has this explanation: In the language of visual design, a...